Lifestyle: Lighting trends for 2017 from Festive Lights


Everyone knows that lighting makes a room. So when it comes to your garden, it’s obvious that the same rules apply. Now that we’ve finally started to settle in the new place, and now we have the bedroom, bathroom, living room and kitchen pretty much sorted, my eyes are on the yard. After reading that Hygge book that everyone was obsessed with, I think I’ve pretty much cracked it in the bedroom and living room. But I’m not quite there with the yard yet. As much as my Pinterest boards are looking pretty full of festoon lighting and creative ideas for lanterns.

I’ve been wanting a little garden for a pretty long time now, and I can’t wait to decorate the space. Right now, it’s still most certainly a work in progress. We’ve started on the garden furniture but it’s mostly empty pots ready to be planted. So when Festive Lights shared some of their top tips for 2017’s trends, I thought it was worth noting a few…

First of all less is more

According to Festive Lights, 2017 is all about soft light. Much like what we’ve done with the sitting room and bedroom, it’s about soft accent lighting that creates ambiance. Rather than floodlighting your space. Instead, think about both the size of the light and its positioning in your space. It’s better to let one or two pieces stand out as features than clutter too many pieces together.

Fairy lights & festoon lighting

Let’s be frank, when have fairy lights not been a thing? Whether you’re looking for a dainty little fairy light or a more retro feeling festoon light, they look great and are really versatile. If like me you have quite a small space to work with, you can try draping them over fences, wrapping around trees, or stringing across open spaces to create a cosy atmosphere.

Layering creates the illusion of space

Taking the same principal as layering clothes, creating layers in your garden can be a great way of allowing you to design a unique atmosphere. It’s about bringing together all of the small elements, creating contrast that widen spaces using light and dark, or giving the illusion of more space with reflective pieces. Considering the space as a whole means that even if you’re working with the smallest of gardens, you can create something beautiful.

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